Author Jr,Timothy D. Baker
Article Title An Archaeology of History : The Wang Mang Nine Temples from Early Imperial China as Reconstructed by History and by Archaeology
Full text http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02757206.2013.726714
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Source History and anthropology. vol. 24, no. 3 (Sep. 2013), p.380-397
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Call number Article
Journal Title History and anthropology.
Copy vol. 24, no. 3 (Sep. 2013), p.380-397
ISSN 0275-7206
Brief substance In this paper, I examine the relationship between the construction of history by the textual history of early imperial China and by Chinese archaeology in the second half of the twentieth century, considering how these two fields of scholarship were directed by ideologies of the Chinese government. The locus for this investigation is the complex of imperial ancestral temples constructed by the emperor Wang Mang (r. 9–23 CE) for his brief interregnum dynasty. Although this group of buildings is described in the official dynastic history, compiled only fifty years after its construction, as having nine temple buildings with specific ancestors ascribed to each, its archaeological excavation in the late 1950s instead revealed twelve temples in a carefully organized plan. The discrepancy between the original construction of the temple complex and its subsequent revision in textual history is revealing in terms of the relationship between received tradition and individual action in the context of establishing imperial legitimacy, whereas the modern attempts to reconcile the discrepancy between textual history and excavated history are indicative of the relationship between Chinese archaeology of that period and the nationalist revision of history
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Full text http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02757206.2013.726714

 
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