Author Rowse, Tim
Article Title “Rooted in Demographic Reality” : The Contribution of New World Censuses to Indigenous Survival
Full text http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02757206.2014.882832
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Source History and anthropology. vol. 25, no. 2 (Apr. 2014), p.246-262
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Call number Article
Journal Title History and anthropology.
Copy vol. 25, no. 2 (Apr. 2014), p.246-262
ISSN 0275-7206
Brief substance One of the most powerful narratives deployed by colonists in the nineteenth century was that the colonized natives were inherently too weak to survive contact with those who were colonizing them—the Dying Native story. I argue that to understand the history of this story, we should differentiate between three senses in which it could be taken as true or false: physical destruction, genetic adulteration and loss of distinct culture. The physical destruction version of the “Dying Native” was contested by some settler-colonial governments as they developed the capacity to manage and measure the numbers of those whom they classified as “Indian” or “Māori” or “Aboriginal”. However, the “Dying Native” story persisted as a narrative of these peoples' loss of genetic and/or cultural distinction. One strategy of Indigenous intellectuals has been to assert that they have survived as “populations” by adapting as “peoples”. In this paper, I show how an authoritative demography of colonized Indigenous populations in North America and New Zealand afforded discursive opportunities to some Indigenous intellectuals
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Full text http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02757206.2014.882832

 
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