Author Hoelle, Jeffrey
Article Title Cattle Culture in the Brazilian Amazon
Full text http://sfaajournals.net/doi/pdf/10.17730/humo.73.4.u61u675428341165
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Source Human organization vol. 73, no. 4 (Winter 2014), p. 363-374: ill
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Call number Article
Journal Title Human organization
Copy vol. 73, no. 4 (Winter 2014), p. 363-374: ill
ISSN 0018-7259
Brief substance The majority of research on the expansion of cattle raising in Amazonia focuses on political economic drivers and resultant deforestation. The cultural constructions surrounding cattle raising, which are central to understanding the appeal of this livelihood in other parts of the world, have yet to be described in the Brazilian Amazon. This paper examines "cattle culture"—the positive cultural constructions associated with cattle raising and analyzes the paths that brought it to one of the "greenest" corners of Amazonia. In the western Amazon state of Acre, Brazil, the rubber tapper movement protested the arrival of cattle ranching in the 1980s, capturing worldwide attention with a message of sustainable forest-based development. Across Amazonia, groups who once opposed or were displaced by cattle are now adopting it—including Acrean rubber tappers and colonists. Drawing on primary data collected among rural and urban groups in Acre, I explain how cattle culture emerged in a state with a short and contested history with cattle raising. I focus specifically on the relationship between the cattle economy and cattle culture through analysis of three processes: local subsistence practices resulting in symbolic associations; the diffusion of market-oriented ranching and the dominant cauboi (cowboy) culture, and the ways that the two overlap and are negotiated among Acrean groups
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Full text http://sfaajournals.net/doi/pdf/10.17730/humo.73.4.u61u675428341165

 
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