Author Jammes, Jeremy
Article Title Benedictine Monastic Communitas in Wartime Central Vietnam (1954–75)
full text https://doi.org/10.1111/taja.12240
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Source The Australian journal of anthropology. vol. 28, no. 2 (Aug. 2017), p. 210-224
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Call number Article
Journal Title The Australian journal of anthropology.
Copy vol. 28, no. 2 (Aug. 2017), p. 210-224
ISSN 1035-8811
Brief substance This article focuses on the question of the establishment of a Catholic monastic tradition, shaped by its Western creation and subsequent exportation to an Asian society. In 1954 the French Benedictine Congregation of St. Bathilde of Vanves founded a monastery in Central Vietnam. The circumstances of the Vietnam war, coupled with a holistic implementation plan instigated by the nuns, enabled the establishment of a small, but sedentary and durable, community, organised within Benedictine structures involving a girls’ hostel, plantation agriculture and catechism instruction. Choosing a life of self‐denial alongside the indigenous people, they eventually formed a ‘Benedictine community village’, implementing a non‐monastic but austere and disciplined life. However, these Benedictine nuns continuously self‐transformed and re‐defined themselves vis‐à‐vis their ‘spiritual tradition’. The pursuit of a life of interiority produced a form of rupture with older forms of evangelisation and with established clergy, reflecting the way in which these nuns conceived their alternative role in the Benedictine tradition. I interrogate here the Benedictine ascetic form and the place given by the Order to new alternative subjectivities
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full text https://doi.org/10.1111/taja.12240

 
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