Author Kil, Tine
Article Title Parental leave uptake among migrant and native mothers: Can precarious employment trajectories account for the difference?
Full text https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1468796817715292
Subject
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Source Ethnicities. vol. 18, no. 1 (Feb. 2018), 106-141 p.
My List
Share
Card Marc
เขตข้อมูลข้อมูล
Call number Article
Journal Title Ethnicities.
Copy vol. 18, no. 1 (Feb. 2018), 106-141 p.
ISSN 1468-7968
Co author Neels, Karel
Co author Wood, Jonas
Brief substance Family policies such as parental leave schemes increasingly support the work–family balance. Low maternal employment in migrant populations raises questions on family policy uptake among mothers of migrant origin. This study documents differences in parental leave uptake between native and migrant mothers of different origin groups and generations, and assesses the extent to which precarious employment trajectories can account for these differentials. Using longitudinal data from Belgian social security registers, mixed-effects logit models of leave uptake, full-time or part-time leave uptake and the labour market position following leave are estimated for 10,976 mothers who entered parenthood between 2004 and 2010. Results indicate that uptake of parental leave is lower among mothers of migrant origin, since they fail to meet the eligibility criteria as a result of being overrepresented in unstable labour market positions. Whereas differential leave uptake can be accounted for by non-universal eligibility and precarious labour market trajectories, migrant-native differentials in part-time uptake and labour market positions following leave persist when controlling for pre-birth employment characteristics. The differential pattern of leave uptake among first-generation migrant women, in particular, is not explained by pre-birth employment characteristics, as they remain overrepresented in full-time leave, and first-generation mothers of non-European origin more frequently retreat from the labour force following leave. We conclude that difficult access to stable employment and non-universal eligibility are major factors explaining migrant-native differentials in parental leave use. As such, Belgian parental leave policies perpetuate labour market disadvantages by limiting support for work–family reconciliation to those already established in the labour force
Subject
Subject
Subject
Subject
Subject
Subject
Subject
Subject
Subject
Full text https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1468796817715292

 
Member Review Librarian Review

  Comments   

    Recently viewed