Author Morrissey, Suzanne
Article Title Landscapes of Loss and Recovery: The Anthropology of Police-Community Relations and Harm Reduction
Full text https://doi.org/10.17730/0018-7259.78.1.28
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Source Human organization vol. 78, no. 1 (Spring 2019), p. 28-42
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Call number Article
Journal Title Human organization
Copy vol. 78, no. 1 (Spring 2019), p. 28-42
ISSN 0018-7259
Co author Nyrop, Kris
Co author Lee, Teresa
Brief substance In Seattle, Washington, people dedicated to street outreach services and changing arrest patterns among low-level drug offenders and commercial sex workers are involved in an exciting program: Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD). LEAD represents a collaborative project of the United States Department of Corrections, Seattle Police Department, King County Crisis Diversion Facility, the Defender Association Racial Disparity Project, and ACLU of Washington State. The authors initiated qualitative assessment of the program in the summer of 2012; along with other fieldwork activities, interview guides were developed for interviews with LEAD participants, case managers, and police officers to assess the effectiveness of harm reduction features of the program. The research found that LEAD mediated between two opposing perspectives: community members (neighbors, business owners) who seek an intensification of police surveillance and more arrests versus law enforcement officers and officials who contend that no more arrests can be made because of dwindling criminal justice resources. This article explores contestation over urban space and how LEAD can function beyond its immediate goal of channeling clients away from prosecution and incarceration to include bridging divides that threaten to destabilize neighborhood-police relations
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Full text https://doi.org/10.17730/0018-7259.78.1.28

 
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